"This Beautiful Place," Gay Magazine

"This Beautiful Place," Gay Magazine

The light has been returning for two months, but inside their cells the women can’t tell that the sun has just set. There are no windows. The yellow-orange of fluorescents light the halls. Kristin and I meet with the women twice a month, buzz into the detention center from the sidewalk, and wait for the guard to come. We pass through the metal detectors, turn in our driver’s licenses, and pause at three different bolted doors as the guard buzzes each of them open.

The light from the lengthening days makes it feel like anything is possible — for me, for the women in the jail, for the world. 

"Stressing the Roots," Tin House Magazine

"Stressing the Roots," Tin House Magazine

The fifty-two-quart cooler is filled to capacity with bags of frozen green chile. On this three-day journey of over 1,200 miles, from our small hometown in New Mexico to our new home in Missoula, Montana, I have made it my priority to keep the chile from thawing.

To read the essay, purchase Tin House Magazine, Volume 20, Number 4 (The Final Issue)

"Disembodied," Kenyon Review

"Disembodied," Kenyon Review

In “Disembodied,” we see a writer investigating the natural world, her personal history, and the nature of violence and destruction in its many forms—environmental destruction, the destruction of ones own being as a means of survival, destruction in order to save those we love. She weaves together her own story with philosophy, with journalism, with science, with history, with mythology, with poetry, with linguistics, and the results are lyrical and powerful. This essay is a fine balancing act.  

--Jaquira Diaz, judge of the 2016 AWP Writers Conferences & Centers Award for Creative Nonfiction

For a longer excerpt of "Disembodied," read online at the Kenyon Review. For the full essay, order the print issue of the Sept/Oct 2017 Kenyon Review

"Basura," The Rumpus

"Basura," The Rumpus

"There are reasons that the most impoverished communities are the ones where trash clogs the rivers and collects in curb-side gutters. Some days I am quick to point my finger. I mutter about the irresponsibility of my neighbors and scowl at the litter covering their yards. But I know better."

[An essay] about America's culture of waste and what our garbage tells us about who we are and what we value. --Rumpus editors

"How to Become an Intersectional Feminist," Camas Magazine

"How to Become an Intersectional Feminist," Camas Magazine

"Read all the parenting books you can get your hands on. Recognize slowly that every so-called expert refers to their own experience, their own cultural norms, and to studies with questionable methods. Chuck the books with your new insight that all children are essentially guinea pigs." 

For the rest of the essay, order the print Summer 2017 issue of Camas Magazine.